Nottingham Clinical Trials Unit
The University of Nottingham
University of Nottingham
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REHABILITATION

 

CRAMMS

 

Trial Name:  Cognitive Rehabilitation for Attention and Memory for people with Multiple Sclerosis (CRAMMS)

Chief Investigator:  Nadina Lincoln, The University of Nottingham

Trial Description:  Around two thirds of people with Multiple Sclerosis experience difficulties paying attention, learning, remembering new things and planning tasks. This can be distressing for the individual and their family and friends. Small scale trials suggest that cognitive rehabilitation may be effective to improve memory in people with MS. However, large randomised controlled trials have not been performed.

This trial assessed whether a group cognitive rehabilitation programme plus usual care was associated with reduced impact of MS on quality of life, compared to usual care alone. The primary outcome was the psycholofical impact of MS on everyday life 12 months after randomisation. Recruitment completed on time in March 2017 with a total of 449 randomised participants.  Follow-up was completed in March 2018, and the results showed that the proposed cognitive rehabilitation programme had no long-term benefits on quality of life for people with multiple sclerosis. 

Contact: Florence Day

Funding:  NIHR Health Techonology Assessment

Status:  Published

Publications: 2016-15, 2019-22

Further Information:  Florence Day (Trial Manager) cramms@nottingham.ac.uk

 

Remembrin

 

Trial Name:  Rehabilitation of memory following traumatic brain injury: a randomised trial (ReMemBrin Trial)

Chief Investigator:  Roshan das Nair, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust

Trial Description:  Memory problems are common following traumatic brain injury. These can not only be persistent, but may be debilitating and difficult to treat. The effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation following brain injury has been assessed in randomised trials, which have mainly focused on attention, executive functions, and visual neglect. Memory rehabilitation has not been sufficiently researched, however.

This trial evaluated a group memory rehabilitation programme for adults, including military personnel, who have had a traumatic brain injury. The study compared group based memory rehabilitation plus usual care with usual care alone. The primary outcome was an assessment of memory at six months. 328 participants were recruited, with follow-up finishing in December 2016.  The final results, published in 2019 showed that group memory rehabilitation, as delivered in this trial, is unlikely to lead to clinical benefits. 

Contact: Florence Day

Funding:  NIHR Health Techonology Assessment

Status:  Published

Publications: 2015-2; 2019-7, 2019-23

Further Information:  Florence Day (Trial Manager) remembrin@nottingham.ac.uk

 

 

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